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OUR TOP 10 - CELEBRITIES WEARING ALL THINGS WAVEY

OUR TOP 10 - CELEBRITIES WEARING ALL THINGS WAVEY

It’s obvious that 80s and 90s fashion has always been loved, whether that be during that era or now, it still has such a huge following. To such an extent that both Tommy Hilfiger and Ralph Lauren have brought back a 90s flavour on their new releases. For example, Tommy Hilfiger bringing back items with their huge Tommy logo on, as for the best part of 90s clothing, the bigger the logo, the better the item. However, as it’s not always 80s and 90s wear that stands out from the crowd, we thought we would compose our personal top 10 celebs wearing all things wavey.

1) The big man Mike Tyson 

Here we have him sporting that serious bootleg Tommy Hilfiger top whilst walking his pet tiger. Bootlegs were a huge thing in the 90s and loads of celebs had the likes of Dapper Dan making them. Bootleg is still just as big now as people just love that over branding big logo 90s look. 

Shop our bootleg collection - Shop here 

2) Posh & Becks 

Here we see Posh and Becks looking like they should be en route to a UK Garage rave. We have Posh outshining Becks with that serious Polo Sport puffer and Air Max's. Mad to think that  Air Max 97s have made a huge return this year, with so many people now after them, lets hope these don't become some over-hyped item. 

Shop our Polo Sport collection - Shop here 

3) Snoop Dogg 

Snoop Dogg flexing a seriously hard Tommy rugby shirt (one of our all-time favourites) whilst performing "Lodi Dodi" on Saturday Night Live in 1994. Click here to see the full video. 

Shop our Tommy Hilfiger collection - Shop here 

4) Kardashians

You either love 'em or hate 'em, but based off this photo we love 'em, all Burbs everything.

Shop our Burberry collection - Shop here 

5) Robin Williams 

RIP to this absolute don, let’s take a moment to appreciate him stunting this wonderful Bape shirt like no other. 

Shop our shirt collection - Shop here

6) The real OG, The Notorious B.I.G

When most people see the iconic brand of Coogi, they will always think Biggie, these sweatshirts still bang. However, let's not forget the more recent celebs to be seen wearing them such as McGregor and Mayweather. Also numerous rappers including Snoop Dogg, A$AP Rocky, A$AP Yams and Action Bronson.

 

Shop our Coogi collection - Shop here
.

7) Wu Tang Clans Raekwon the Chef 

Here he is rocking a Polo Ralph Lauren “Snow Beach” jacket in the song "Can it be all so simple" which ended up being one of the most iconic pieces of apparel in hip-hop. Not only in hip-hop, it was something everyone was interested in and still is now. However, these hardly ever pop up and if they do they have some next level prices being asked for them.

Shop our Ralph Lauren collection - Shop here

 8) Alan Partridge

Not the kinda guy you would expect to see in Stone Island, but here we have him with a Stone Island heavy knit on.

 

9) Noel Gallagher

Again we have another celeb wearing a brand you wouldn’t expect, here's Noel rocking a Polo Sport Mountain Patch parka.

Shop our Polo Sport collection - Shop here.

10) Kanye West (Pre-Yeezy madness) 

Back in Kanye's earlier days before all the Yeezy madness, he was spotted wearing the Ralph Lauren “Polo Bear” range numerous times, we have him here in the grey sweat and navy knit a couple years apart. Again, these items are so sought after, with Ralph Lauren having brought out  numerous bear ranges since as they never get old. 

 

 Big up for reading! 

 

    September 04, 2017 by lyle cross
    Garm Guides - Episode 1: Stone Island

    Garm Guides - Episode 1: Stone Island

    Stone Island has always been popular amongst many, from the Paninaro youth culture in the 80s to football enthusiasts, and more recently the Grime and Rap scene with the likes of Drake and Travis Scott. Yet, no matter who is buying Stone Island, one thing that seems inevitable is the hundreds of fakes plastered over the internet. I have put together this guide in the hope that you can learn a thing or two on spotting fakes. Also, to hopefully stop anyone from being bumped when it comes to purchasing Stone Island.  

    Going to try keep this short and sweet (as much as I can).

    Price

    To some, this may seem common sense, but if it is too good to be true price wise, then you can be 99.9% certain that it will be a fake. Don’t get me wrong you can grab a bargain, but Stone Island is expensive, especially new items so just be wary. There are a ton of moody sites out there selling Stone Island at stupidly low prices, I have popped an example below. Avoid these kind of sites like the plague. 

    Art No.

    All Stone Island items should have an art number on the wash label, unless it is a proper vintage piece (before 1986) then, in that case, it may not. One main thing to keep in mind, is that the majority of fakes will have 222 at the end of the art number. 

    Tag example (1) – Art no. 49151504/251 

    Tag example (2) - Art no. 28154X44/4

    How it works:

    The first two numbers let you know the year and season when the item was made.

    Even numbers = Spring/Summer range

    Odd numbers = Autumn/Winter range

    Year

    Art No.

    Year

    Art No.

    Year

    Art No.

    Year

    Art No.

    1990

    12/13

    1997

    26/27

    2004

    40/41

    2011

    54/55

    1991

    14/15

    1998

    28/29

    2005

    42/43

    2012

    56/57

    1992

    16/17

    1999

    30/31

    2006

    44/45

    2013

    58/59

    1993

    18/19

    2000

    32/33

    2007

    46/47

    2014

    60/61

    1994

    20/21

    2001

    34/35

    2008

    48/49

    2015

    62/63

    1995

    22/23

    2002

    36/37

    2009

    50/51

    2016

    64/65

    1996

    24/25

    2003

    38/39

    2010

    52/53

    2017

    66/67

    In example (1), the two numbers are 49, meaning it’s an Autumn/Winter item from 2008. Then for example (2), the two numbers are 28 meaning it's an Spring/summer item from 1998. 

    The next two number show you the brand they come under:

    13 – CP under 16

    14 – Stone Island Denim

    15 – Stone Island

    16 - Stone Island Junior

    18 – CP Company

    20 – CP Donna

    In both cases, you can see on the labels, 15, meaning it is Stone Island

    The fifth number shows the type of item:

    0 – Leather

    1 -  Shirts

    2 – T-Shirts

    4 – Shoulder Pieces

    5 – Knitwear

    6 – Sweatshirts

    7 – Long Coats

    8 – Suit

    9 – Bags/Hats/Accessories

    A – Jacket/Blazer

    B – Swimming Trunks

    G – Waistcoat

    L – Bermuda Shorts

    M – Jacket

    S – Shoes

    In this case, the example (1) has the number 1, meaning it's a shirt. And example (2) has the number 4, meaning it's a shoulder piece. 

    The last 4 numbers refer to the manufacturer, material, dying and treatment processes.

    Buttons & Zips

    The buttons should always have Stone Island printed around them unless it is a really old piece. The centre should be a cross, not 4 holes which you see on a lot of fakes. However, certain jackets do not apply to this rule.

    An example of real buttons

    The zips will always be manufactured by a reputable brand such as YKK or Lampo or feature the brands name and logo printed on them. However, this is not always the case, but when looking at the zips, you will want to see if they look and feel of a higher quality as they are made to last, so will never be flimsy.

    Arm Patch/ Badge

    This can sometimes confuse people, as some replicas will have real badges, and some real items may have ended up with a fake badge on them (Second-hand gear). But you want to check for drop stitching near the buttons, that’s one big giveaway. Also 9 times out of 10, a fake badge will look off colour wise, look out of proportion, stitching off, and like card, it looks that hard. Remember to keep in mind that there are numerous types of badges, for example, green edge badges (Vintage badges), the standard badge, Ice badges etc. 

    Fake buttons & Badge Example - 4 holed buttons, stiff batches, colours off, and no drop stitch near the button holes

    Real buttons & Badge Example – cross buttons, drop stitch on the button holes, stitching is fine (this is an example of a used item)

    An example of real buttons & a vintage green edge badge

    Another example of a vintage green edge badge (front shot)

    An example of a vintage Stone Island badge (back shot)

    An example of a fake modern badge

    There are also a few different badges that you don't see as often which are worth noting. Here are a few examples of the real versions.

    Top left - 30th anniversary Tela Stella jacket badge. Bottom left - Ghost badge, you may also see these in different colours. Top right - Seen on Stone Island ice items. Bottom right - mesh Stone Island badge seen on a mixture of items.

    Some laughable examples of Stone Island fakes

    And a personal favourite... (By the way, items will never have a double badge)

    Certilogo

    The last thing to touch on is to do with more recent Stone Island items. Since the Spring/Summer 2014 collection, Stone Island has used Certilogo. This allows people to check the authenticity of their Stone Island item using the 12 digit code, or scanning the QR code with their phone. These will always be found on the security labels inside the item. See an example below.

    Right, that's the end, hope that all helped and you now know how to spot that Clone Island. Thanks for reading, this is only Episode 1 by the way, I will be writing these on many other brands such as Tommy Hilfiger, Polo Ralph Lauren, etc. so make sure to keep an eye out!

    April 28, 2017 by lyle cross